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A fortay into France's local culinary scene

A fortay into France's local culinary scene

France is renowned for its world-class, gourmet fare. Despite this reputation for haute cuisine, the French know how to make a snack or a meal for convenience, too. Whether you’re on the go or in need of a quick repast, here are some tasty street foods to look for in France:

  • Crêpes are an omnipresent street food in France. As a snack, the French tend to go for the sweet variety, but the savoury types, called galettes, are just as delicious, too.
  • Ham and butter baguette – The long French loaf of bread, known as a baguette, has a crunchy exterior crust with a softer interior and rich taste. French ham packs just enough savoury flavour without being too salty. And creamy butter makes it a delicious trifecta.
  • Pain au chocolat – Usually consumed in the morning, the pain au chocolat is a perfect way to sweeten your day.
From branch to table: Spain & Portugal

From branch to table: Spain & Portugal

Spain and Portugal are some of the world’s top olive producers. On a journey through Spain and Portugal, these are some of the top olive varieties you’ll find in the groves and in your meals. 

Spain:
Spain is the top producer of olives in the world, with over 2.4 million hectares of land dedicated to groves.

Manzanilla - These are some of the most popular table olives in Spain. Its name translates to “little apple,” referring to its rounded shape and fleshy texture similar to the fruit. These are the most common olives used in the iconic tapa, stuffed with pimento cheese.

Portugal:
There are over 30 varieties of olives in Portugal, and some grow exclusively in the country. While Portugal’s olives and oils might be lesser-known that those of Spain, Italy, and Greece, they’re still just as delicious. 

Galega  - This black olive is grown exclusively in Portugal, and is often known as “the Portuguese olive.” This variety accounts for at least 80% of the country’s olives. It has a slightly fruity yet bitter flavour, with rich peppery undertones. 

South America: new, unique experiences

South America: new, unique experiences

In Buenos Aires, one of the best ways to experience the sprawling countryside is with a hearty asado lunch. This cookout is a popular feature of Argentinian cuisine, bringing together family and friends to nourish both body and soul. While asado can be found throughout the nation, one of the best places to experience it is at an estancia, or cattle estate, where the meat is fresh and roasted to perfection.

The estancia is a working farm where cattle roam and gauchos, or cowboys, can be found. To make ends meet, the gauchos would often venture from estancia to estancia to find work. While the end of the 19th century saw a decline in these enigmatic figures, the gauchos have seen a resurgence thanks to local and international tourism.

While at an Argentinian estancia, savour a delicious asado lunch comprised of slow roasted meats. While there, you’ll get a chance to meet a few of these working gauchos and learn of their fascinating traditions.

Discover Europe’s Largest Market

Discover Europe’s Largest Market

Who would have thought that a tiny Baltic country on the Russian border would lay claim to the largest market in all of Europe? Latvia’s capital city Riga did just that – converting a sprawling airplane hangar from World War I into a place where neighbours and local communities can come together for produce, pastries, and pansies.

Feeling adventurous? Here are some of the more unconventional market items that might test your taste buds.

  • Kefir: This is a fermented milk drink that is a favourite among locals for its health benefits. You can find it throughout eastern Europe.
  • Freshly-smoked fish: Latvia is nestled against the Baltic Sea, so it should be no surprise that fish is a main export.
  • Pickled snacks: Pickled fish, pickled cabbage, pickled fruit, pickled vegetables, pickled garlic, pickled mushrooms, pickled everything!
  • Jāņi Cheese: This is Latvia’s signature cheese. It is made from curd and milk, but eggs, butter and Carraway seeds are added for a little extra flavour.
Southeast Asia: Bold. Complex. Dynamic.

Southeast Asia: Bold. Complex. Dynamic.

In addition to exotic fruits, Southeast Asia is known for its vast array of delectable vegetables. Here are some of the vegetables you can expect to find at Southeast Asian markets and dining experiences:

  • Opo Squash – With mild taste like cucumbers or zucchini, this gourd, also known as calabash, has a dynamic taste that goes well in many dishes. It is a staple ingredient in the Vietnamese soup, canh bau tom, which contains diced shrimp and green onion with flavours of fish sauce and sesame oil.
  • Daikon Radish – This Asian radish is white in color with the shape of a large carrot. It is most often fermented to be used in kimchi, but can also be pickled for use in sashimi. It also works raw in a modestly flavoured salad.
  • Japanese Eggplant – This longer, thinner-skinned version of the traditional eggplant has a sweet and mild flavour. It is a great addition to stir-fried and grilled dishes, and also tastes great deep-fried.

 

For more information, contact your Travel Professional

Contact your Travel Professional

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